Category Archives: Macro

Strategy Follow-up: Eldar vs Salamanders

Hey all. You guys asked for a strategy discussion for our battle reports and here is our first go at it. Leave a comment and let us know if this is what you were looking for. In this video I go through how I approached the game and explain the different micro tactics that I used to help give myself the edge. If there was anything else in particular that you were interested in knowing just ask in a comment below and I will try my best to answer.

We have really appreciated all of the great support you guys have already given to us in our very short start-up so far. We are always improving with your advice, so keep it up.

So far we have on the battle report request queue we have: Dark Eldar vs. Grey Knights, Tyranids, and more Grey Knights.

Be sure to friend, like, subscribe, and follow our respective social networking sites. Thanks for watching.

Advertisements

Macro-Game Play: Approaching Mission 5

Sometimes you don’t need focus a lot of resources to hold an objective.

Hey all, Son of Adam here with a run-through of how to approach mission number five in the BRB, “The Emperor’s Will.”  Eventually there will be an “Approaching” article for each of the missions, but we are going to start with five.  Why five and not one? Because this one is the most interesting and the one I have seen messed up the most.

             First off, let’s look at what makes up mission five.  All of the rules for mission five are the standard for all missions; warlord traits, night fighting, reserves, secondary objectives, etc.  What distinguishes it is the amount and placement of the objectives.  There are only two objectives; one for each player.  These objectives are subject to the normal rules, but contrary to 5th, these objectives are place in the owning player’s table half.  (Note that they no longer have to be in the owning player’s deployment zone).

            So, how do we follow the golden rules in order to win the game?  The victory conditions are achieved by having more victory points than your opponent.  Let’s break this down in a real blunt and simple way.  We can guarantee this points preponderance by claiming both primary objectives, claiming one primary and secondary objective while the opponent doesn’t claim a primary, or by claiming more secondary objectives while neither player claims a primary.  These are all very obvious, but now that they have been overtly stated we can look at how to achieve each of them. 

            The first, and most difficult to achieve, is claiming both primary objectives.  This mission in 5th edition (capture and control) was not dubbed “mission tie game” for nothing.  It usually goes one of three ways.  First, both players do a full out attack and leave one scoring unit behind.  Second, both players castle and wait, and third, some combination thereof.  And then when the dust settles, if the game isn’t already over, each player tries to dash towards whatever objective isn’t claimed.  Generally this is just a very hard way to win mission five.  Usually it is only possible with a much stronger list, poor play from your opponent, or really lucky dice.

            The next way is to claim a primary objective and deny your opponent from claiming one, while remembering to score one of the secondary objectives.  This method is much easier to win with and is often the overlooked play.  You pick which primary objective is more of a guarantee to claim and work to claim that one by the end of the game.  Then you stay alive.  You can try to find ways to remove your opponent from the other primary objective by baiting him or confusing him with deployment, but essentially you want to be alive and in a position to contest their primary objective for the end of the game.  If you can manage not to get yourself killed, you can claim your own objective while defending it and contesting the opponent at the same time.  It takes a bit of finesse and there are many different ways to do it, but the focus is on claiming on primary while contesting the other.

            And lastly, you can tie for the win.  If you think that it will too hard to claim both or contest one primary objective and will end up being “mission tie game,” you can play for the tie and play for the secondary objectives.  I won’t go into this too much, there is already an article up about it, but suffice to say, make sure your list can handle the secondary objectives and play for them without revealing that you are.

            In the end I usually play for method two, while banking on method three.  This way I play very conservatively while acquiring the secondary objectives and make the push for the last turn contest.

 

            Let me know your thoughts.  Basic article, but you know I like to look at the overlooked basics for the win.  Do you have any stories about “mission tie game?”  Post up your comments/criticism and make sure to like/follow/sub to our stuff.  Thanks for reading.

Tying for the Win

Hey guys, Son of Adam here with a quick article on tying for the win. This is part of the third sphere of game strategy; macro-game-play. Let’s hop down this rabbit hole and see what’s inside.

After a long hard fought battle sometimes both players get the same number of kill points, or have the same number of objectives and the game comes down to those good ol’ secondary objectives. Now that we are talking about sixth those are the; slay the warlord, line-breaker, and first blood objectives. When tying for the win, as the name says, you try to do this intentionally. However, if you are playing in a tournament with different rules you will need to figure out if this tactic will work and what other subtle things you need to do in order to pull it off.

Jetbikes are often overlooked in list building, but their manueverability is useful for getting into the enemy’s deployment zone.

Playing for the tie is often much easier than going for the win, but with this tactic you can achieve both. At the start of the match take a minute and look at the mission and both armies, then judge for yourself; do I have an easier time at winning the secondary and tying the primary or at winning the primary? Whichever one turns out to be more of a sure thing is the one you should go for.

You must be subtle when you do this, as in the minds of most players it will be the battle for the primary and a disregard of the secondary. Let’s continue on in the Art of War(hammer) here.

“9. As circumstances are favorable, modify your plans.

10. All warfare is based on deception.

11. Hence, when able to take the objective, we must appear unable; when using our forces, we must seem inactive; when we are near, we must appear far away; we must make them believe we are other than what we are.

12. If your enemy’s strength is greater than your own evade him and seek victory another way.

13. Attack where he is unprepared, appear where you are unexpected.

14. These tactical methods, which lead to victory, cannot be divulged beforehand.

15. The general who wins has made many calculations before the battle is fought, likewise the general who makes few looses. Therefore, calculate how you may achieve victory beforehand and it shall be yours.”

So, when your force is outmatched you must modify your plans and play for a victory through secondary objectives while still appearing to play for the primary. When doing this, you will then appear where you are not expected, and attack what he has not prepared, and secure the victory.

When considering the secondary objectives, Draigo is a great choice. Not only is he hard to kill, but he also excells against other warlords.

When you are building your list keep this tactic in mind. As an example; if you know you will be playing the standard 6th edition missions, build a list that can achieve first blood, has a general that is hard to kill, and can use its mobility to get into the enemies deployment zone, while still being able to contest objectives. This may make your list look weak to some, which in the end is a good thing, as it will further the deception that you are outmatched and boost the confidence of your opponent.

Go out and try using this tactic. See if you can take victory from a strong opponent or against a list that is stronger than yours. Then make sure you come back here and tell us about it. Be sure to check out our videos and follow/like/comment/sub to our stuff. Thanks for the help fellas.

Please note that all references to the Art of War(hammer) are a fictitious knock off of the real Art of War by Sun Tzu. Some portions are a direct quote; I do not mean to take credit for any of it. Go check it out, it’s a great book.